Building a better battery – Is Apple the Company to Do it?

Building a better battery – Is Apple the Company to Do it?

SAN FRANCISCO: The next breakthrough smartphone, or maybe the one after that, might not have a traditional battery as its sole source of power. Instead, it could pull energy from the air or power itself through television, cellular or Wi-Fi signals.

Building a better battery: Tech companies' new challenge
The next breakthrough smartphone, or maybe the one after that, might not have a traditional battery as its sole source of power.

Engineers at Apple even tried for many years to build a smarter battery by adding solar charging to iPhones and iPods, a former Apple executive said. And they have continued to experiment with solar charging, two people who work at the company said.

Batteries, long the poor cousin to computer chips in research-obsessed Silicon Valley, are now the rage.

As tech companies push their businesses into making wearable devices like fitness bands, eyeglasses and smart watches, the limitations of battery technology have become the biggest obstacle to sales and greater profits. Consumers are unlikely to embrace a wristwatch computer like the one being worked on by Apple, or Google Glass, if they work only a few hours between charges and must be removed to be plugged in.

So the race is on – both to find alternatives to the traditional battery and to discover ways to make battery power last longer.

Consumers are going to say, “Give me a better battery because it doesn’t last long enough,” said Mujeeb Ijaz, chief technology officer at A123 Systems, a company that makes batteries for electric cars and invests in startups that are developing new battery technologies.

“That need wasn’t there five years ago,” he continued. “Now it’s a matter of the market and the developers coming together and saying, what is the need and how many R&D dollars do we put in?”

Although computer chips have doubled in speed every few years, and digital displays have become significantly brighter and sharper, battery technology is largely stuck in the 20th century. Device makers have relied on incremental improvements to battery power, now usually supplied by a decades-old lithium-ion concoction, in combination with more energy-efficient chips and screens.

The problem, in part, is that it is hard to ensure the safety of many new power technologies. A faulty battery could potentially turn into a miniature bomb. So the products require exhaustive testing by regulators before hitting store shelves.

Even if a new power system is approved, it often requires adoption by reputable brands like Apple, Samsung or Microsoft before everyday consumers start to trust it….Original Article  Link HERE

Read more at The Times of India